Sunday, March 2, 2014

Rise Up While You Can - My Speech for the 2014 Day Of Mourning: Remembering People With Disabilities Murdered by Caregivers

This is my speech that I read yesterday, March 1st 2014, at the NYC Vigil for People With Disabilities Murdered by Family/Caregivers.  For more information about the Day of Mourning please go to http://autisticadvocacy.org/2014/02/day-of-mourning-2014-2/.

Hello everyone and welcome to the New York City Vigil for People With Disabilities Murdered by Parents and Caregivers. I’m Cara, the site coordinator for the NYC vigil. This vigil is part of the National Day of Mourning 2014: Remembering People with Disabilities Murdered by Caregivers organized by the Autistic Self Advocacy Network, Not Dead Yet, and many other organizations that have rightfully taken a stand against murder.

If somehow you have ended up in the wrong place and you weren’t planning on being here, you’re free to leave, but I urge you to stay and listen to what we have to say. This is a tragic and deeply disturbing issue that is, unfortunately, only growing.

Before I start, I’d like to take this time to thank Sam Barwick, Emily Baillou, and Jason Ross for helping me organize this vigil. I could not have done this without their support.

A few accessibility notes – we unfortunately were not able to get a sign language interpreter in time for the vigil due to time and budget constraints. Hopefully, if all goes well, we will have captioned video up on Youtube or another video site within a few weeks.

We do have a program available for you to take. This program contains a brief overview of the schedule of the vigil, the reasons for gathering, and the list of the names of the victims. If anyone would like me or one of the other organizers to describe the images contained in the program and/or read aloud the content, we would be more than happy to do that. In addition, if you would like a PDF copy of the pamphlet, please leave your name and email address with me before you leave today.

Please note that this vigil will contain extensive discussion of murder and other triggering issues. If you feel the need to leave at any time, you’re welcome to leave, you’re welcome to come back, you’re welcome to do whatever you need to do. We are here to mourn others, but we must not neglect ourselves in the process.

Though ASAN is the main sponsor of the Day of Mourning, it’s important to realize that this issue is truly cross-disability. This isn’t just about people with developmental disabilities, or intellectual disabilities. There is not one disability group that has been untouched by the murders happening in our community. Though we are divided at the best of times, during these times of trouble, we must unite to stand (and sit) in the path of injustice.

The problem is two-fold. First is the murders themselves. They represent a shocking lack of value for disabled lives, by the very people who are supposed to love unconditionally. Though we are often told to put ourselves in the shoes of these very parents and caregivers, those same people take lives without putting themselves in their victim’s shoes.

The second is the public and media reaction to these murders. Rather than expressing outrage, as is the usual reaction to the murder of a non-disabled person, the media and general public often express sympathy for the murderers, citing lack of services and the joint “suffering” of caregiver and client as justification for murder. If these killers are sentenced at all, their sentences are typically far lighter than the sentence they would have received if they had murdered a non-disabled people.

We come together today to mourn, but far more importantly, to express outrage. We are the largest minority, yet our voices have not been heard. We must be silent no longer, we must scream to the heavens that this is unacceptable. Perhaps if we are loud enough, our voices will finally be heard. If we save just one life, it will all be worth it.

In the words of Georgia Mason, protagonist in Mira Grant’s “Newsflesh” trilogy, rise up while you can.

5 comments :

Anonymous said...

What is going on??? I spent 32 years teaching elementary exceptional education students, my husband spent 30 years working as a rehabilitation counselor. We retired 6 years ago. Neither of us have ever experienced losing one of our students or clients to this kind of thing !!! This must be a new phenomenon. I am shocked and deeply saddened. What has happened to our society in the last 6 years???? How could this be happening??? I am off to do more research on-line......

Mountain Grandma said...

Tracy Latimer is a place to start. At about the same time Susan Smith was igniting outrage by killing her children and blaming a mythical 'black man,' Tracy's father received sympathetic responses when he brutally murdered her and tried to claim she'd died in her sleep. Just one case but far longer than 6 years ago.

Mountain Grandma said...

Tracy Latimer is a place to start. At about the same time Susan Smith was igniting outrage by killing her children and blaming a mythical 'black man,' Tracy's father received sympathetic responses when he brutally murdered her and tried to claim she'd died in her sleep. Just one case but far longer than 6 years ago.

Kevin Angelini said...

Calista Springer is another infamous case for you to look into. And this one happened six years ago right around the time that you and your husband retired.

Magot said...

Great speech Cara! I think all these murders could be from the general disrespect for the value of human life particularly when that life is dependent on another person like many disabled people are. It is destroying our society. We must end this tragedy!!! Before it is too late!